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Feb

FrankTalks lecture series

Opioid crisis focus of Sept. 11 FrankTalks

The Sept. 11, 2017 Franklin Tomorrow FrankTalks was a deep look into the crisis of opioid use and abuse in Williamson County, with a panel of individuals with hands-on knowledge of the rising tide locally.

“Facing the Opioid Crisis” was held in partnership with the Williamson County Anti-Drug Coalition (WCADC) to educate the community about the use and misuse of opioid drugs and the crisis that has hit the nation and the state and is creeping into Williamson County.

Panel members included Cindy Blom, an addiction and recovery counselor whose son’s addiction to opiates eventually ended his life; Tony Owens, a licensed clinical social worker who works with individuals and court-sanctioned programs; and Franklin Police Detective Robert Dilworth. Franklin Tomorrow Board Member Patrick Baggett moderated the panel.

You can watch the video below, provided by the City of Franklin’s FranklinTV, or the Williamson Herald story through this link.


Aug. 14 FrankTalks focuses on safe viewing, info for upcoming total eclipse

Franklin Tomorrow’s FrankTalks on Monday, Aug.14, will help you get ready for a total eclipse of the sun. Get your questions answered about how to safely view the eclipse and pick up some glasses for viewing.

Rocky Alvey

Join Rocky Alvey, director of Vanderbilt Dyer Observatory, and observatory astronomer, Billy Teets, for a fascinating program about The Mighty Sky and specifically about the 2017 Solar Eclipse, which will come right through Middle Tennessee on Aug. 21 in the middle of the day.

To RSVP for the free event, go to https://aug14franktalks.eventbrite.com

Rocky Alvey has been involved in amateur astronomy from 1970 to the present. He has been conducting educational programs and public outreach at Vanderbilt Dyer Observatory and other locations in Tennessee since 2000. Working as an amateur astronomer, he has treated thousands of individuals to views through the eyepiece of his telescopes over the past 40 plus years. In 2007 the Vanderbilt University Chancellor presented Alvey with the Commodore Award in recognition of significant achievements in pursuit of excellence in education and community service.

Billy Teets

At Vanderbilt Dyer Observatory, Teets is responsible for a myriad of projects. He is a regular speaker for the Observatory’s community programs, camps, teacher workshops and special school events and is a knowledgeable and trusted operator of all of the Observatory’s telescopes and astronomical equipment.

He is continuing his community outreach efforts as well as teaching astronomy at Vanderbilt. Since 2012 Billy serves as the Vanderbilt Dyer Observatory Astronomer.

FrankTalks will begin at 9 a.m. at the Westhaven Resident’s Club, 401 Cheltenham Ave., with a 30-minute coffee social, followed by the program at 9:30 a.m.

FrankTalks is free and the public is invited. Franklin Tomorrow partnered with Vanderbilt University’s Office of Neighborhood, Government and Community Relations to expand the frequency of FrankTalks in 2016 to a monthly program. It is held at various locations across the city, but always on the second Monday of the month.


‘Three New Faces to Know in 2017’ topic of June 12 FrankTalks

Join Franklin Tomorrow on Monday, June 12, for our next monthly FrankTalks Lecture and learn about Williamson County’s “Three New Faces to Know in 2017.” The event is being held in the large ballroom at the Williamson County Enrichment Center. Coffee and networking will begin at 9 a.m. and the program will start at 9:30 a.m.

Participating on the panel will be Bari Watson Beasley, the new CEO of the Heritage Foundation of Franklin & Williamson County; Valencia A. Breckenridge, the newly appointed CEO for GraceWorks; and Rob Wigton, the new Executive Vice President for the Williamson County Association of Realtors.

To RSVP for the event, follow this link.

Beasley

Beasley previously worked as the chief officer of marketing and external relations for the General Council on Finance & Administration, a global agency of The United Methodist Church. Beasley brings more than 15 years of experience in marketing and nonprofits and joined the Heritage Foundation this month.

Breckenridge

Breckenridge is a native of Chicago, Illinois and came to Franklin only last November. She most recently served as the Major Gift Officer for Feed My Starving Children, a $40 million hunger-relief organization.

Wigton

Completing the panel is Wigton, who has more than 22 years of experience in various parts of the real estate profession. He has served as the CEO of both a state and local association. He was most recently the CEO of the Greater Gateway Association of REALTORS® in Glen Carbon, Illinois.

We look forward to giving all three panelists a warm welcome as we learn more about them and the future they see for their organizations in Franklin.


TDOT’s Schroer avoids specifics, but drives home details of IMPROVE Act at FrankTalks May 8

Tennessee Department of Transportation Commissioner John Schroer spoke May 8 at Franklin Tomorrow’s FrankTalks. While unable to discuss specifics of his department’s three-year project plan since the Tennessee Legislature had not approved the 2017-18 fiscal year budget, Schroer did drill deep into the details of Gov. Bill Haslam’s IMPROVE Act and its ability to positively impact Tennessee and local roadway networks.

As former mayor of Franklin, Schroer remembers lobbying TDOT officials and the state’s governor for funding for the construction of Mack Hatcher Parkway’s northwest leg, which is reportedly on the three-year projects list. He said Franklin positioned itself to gain the road’s construction by funding more than $5 million in work to ensure it was “shovel ready.”

He also discussed the importance of widening the southeast legs of Mack Hatcher from Columbia Avenue to Highway 96 East and hinted at the design of a southwest leg which would complete the full loop of the road.

He shared the hour-long program with Diane Thorne, regional transportation director for The TMA Group, which is a regional leader in providing innovative, sustainable multi-modal transportation solutions for employers and communities, including the VanStar regional commuter vanpool program, the growing urban public Franklin Transit system, the Clean Air partnership, and Transportation Demand Management programs.

She said Tennessee’s roadway system is the best in the nation and while the framework of the transportation system is the roadway network, “It is not about how many cars you can move on the roadway system, but about how many people you can move on the roadway system.”

Franklin Mayor Ken Moore told the crowd funding has been secured for an I-65 corridor study to further investigate mass transit options, but he expressed the belief that even if a light-rail or bus-rapid transit system were in place to serve the region and corridor today, it would not be successful due to a lack of use by drivers who prefer their vehicles.

Schroer has become a Southeastern and national leader in transportation policy and also discussed the rise of autonomous vehicles, asserting his belief that whether citizens are ready for them or not, they are the wave and way of the future.

“My grandson, who is 4 years old, will never drive a car,” Schroer said, adding unless it were for recreational purposes, but instead would utilize an autonomous vehicle.

FrankTalks is held the second Monday of every month and Vanderbilt University’s Office of Community, Neighborhood and Government Relations has partnered with Franklin Tomorrow to present the series.

To watch the entire video, follow the link below.


TDOT Commissioner Schroer to talk IMPROVE Act, transportation trends May 8

Franklin Tomorrow’s 2017 FrankTalks Lecture Series will continue Monday, May 8, at City Hall in the Training Room. The event will kick off with coffee and networking at 9 a.m. and the program will begin at 9:30 a.m.

Tennessee Department of Transportation Commissioner John Schroer will be our guest, along with representatives of The TMA Group, to discuss the IMPROVE Act and its impact on Williamson County. It is expected TDOT’s three-year project list will be updated and released before Schroer’s appearance on May 8. The Tennessee Legislature is also expected to vote on Gov. Bill Haslam’s budget prior to May 8, giving TDOT knowledge of how much funding will exist.

To RSVP, follow this link.

The IMPROVE Act allows for local option taxes, to be approved by referendum, to fund transit projects, which is part of the work of The TMA Group.

FrankTalks is free and the public is invited. Franklin Tomorrow partnered with Vanderbilt University’s Office of Neighborhood, Government and Community Relations to expand the frequency of FrankTalks in 2016 to a monthly program. It is held at various locations across the city, but always on the second Monday of the month.  

Office of Community, Neighborhood, and Government Relations


April 10 FrankTalks focuses on political divisiveness, seeking understanding

The Williamson Herald
Kerri Bartlett, Managing Editor

According to a few seemingly odd studies cited by Vanderbilt University political science professor Marc Hetherington, liberals like cats more, while conservatives prefer dogs, he said at the recent FrankTalks series, “Political Trust and The Origins of Deep Divisions in Our Country.”

A liberal is more likely to order a veggie burger, or curry chicken with biryani rice, where as a conservative prefers a hamburger and whose favorite meal is most likely meatloaf with mashed potatoes and green beans, Hetherington said, according to grubbhub.com.

Liberals also watch less sports.

According to Hetherington, these seemingly trivial preferences seem to be linked to one’s worldview, and one’s worldview seems to dramatically affect one’s political views and how one votes at the polls.

Because worldviews are so personal and intertwined with every aspect of one’s life, Hetherington says this is the reason political differences are becoming so difficult to resolve.

Hetherington says America is divided within it’s political system, and people are having difficult time understanding each other.

To read the rest of Bartlett’s story, follow this link.

To view Hetherington’s Powerpoint presentation, click on westhaven.talk


Franklin citizen survey shows changing trends, demographics

Tennessean Staff Writer Jordan Buie filed this story, “Franklin citizen survey shows changing trends, demographics,” from the March 13, 2017, Franklin Tomorrow FrankTalks, presented in partnership with Vanderbilt University’s Office of Community, Neighborhood and Government Relations.

You can watch the presentation by Franklin City Administrator Eric Stuckey and Budget & Analytics Manager Michael Walters Young by clicking the image below.

FrankTalks is held the second Monday of the month at various locations across the City to discuss topics and issues current to the quality of life in the City.

The next FrankTalks will be Monday, April 10, at 1 p.m. at Westhaven Residents Center, 401 Cheltenham Ave., with Marc Hetherington, a Vanderbilt University political science professor. His topic will be, “Fixed or Fluid World View: The Polarizing Worldview That Divides our Nation.”


March 13 FrankTalks features citizens’ survey data dive in ‘City Hall on Wheels’ session

Franklin Tomorrow’s 2017 FrankTalks lecture series will continue Monday, March 13, at the new Williamson County Enrichment Center on Columbia Avenue, next to the Williamson County Public Library, in Franklin.

Stuckey

Franklin City Administrator Eric Stuckey will bring the “City Hall on Wheels” to the free, monthly event, which will begin at 9 a.m. with a coffee social, followed at 9:30 a.m. by Stuckey’s presentation.

To RSVP, follow this link.

During his presentation, we will take a deep data dive into the results of the National Citizen Survey, conducted last fall in Franklin by the National Research Center in conjunction with the International City & County Management Association.

The National Citizen Survey captures residents’ opinions within the three pillars of a community — community characteristics, governance, and participation — across eight facets of community — safety, mobility, natural environment, built environment, economy, recreation and wellness, education and enrichment, and community engagement.

Franklin Tomorrow partnered with Vanderbilt University’s Office of Neighborhood, Government and Community Relations to expand the frequency of FrankTalks in 2016 to a monthly program. It is free and held at various locations across the city.


Feb. 13 FrankTalks focuses on community’s mental health, well-being

The Feb. 13 Franklin Tomorrow FrankTalks focused on behavioral and mental health issues in Williamson County, with speakers honing in on the relationship between environment and well-being.

As reported by Carole Robinson of the Williamson Herald, while suicide ranks ninth in Tennessee for leading causes of death, in Williamson County, it is the second leading cause of death.

FrankTalks is a monthly lecture series presented by Vanderbilt University Office of Community, Neighborhood and Government Relations. It addresses topics and issues during its monthly sessions on the second Monday of the month at various locations across the city and county.

Guest speakers Feb. 13 included Taylor Cochran, director of marketing for Insight Counseling; Michael Acker, vice president of regional operations for the Blue Zone Project, a division of Healthways; Franklin Mayor Ken Moore; and Vona Wilson, chaplain of the YMCA of Middle Tennessee.

BlueZones, first identified by author and researcher Dan Buettner, are places “across the globe were people were living longer better simply by living in places that supported improved health and well being,” Acker said, adding their environment supported their well-being.

Those locations include Ikaria, Greece; Okinawa, Japan; the Ogliastra Region of Sardinia, Italy; Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica; and Loma Linda, Calif.

Research uncovered nine common denominators relating each of those locations, Acker said. The environments encourage natural movement such as walking or working in a garden. The people have a sense of purpose – a reason to get up in the morning. They’ve established a protocol for managing stress, which includes praying, napping or enjoying a happy hour.

Healthways, which is based in Franklin’s Cool Springs, now works with Buettner to establish new BlueZones across the United States. The company and Gallup formed a 25-year partnership that merged their respective areas of expertise in surveying, clinical research, and behavioral economics to create the Well-Being Index. The Index asks individuals about their well-being in 5 domains: purpose, social, financial, community, and physical.

“Since 2008, we have collected data for every MSA, congressional district, and state with surveying done seven days a week,” Acker said, adding the company uses landline and cellphone, in English and Spanish. To date, they have collected over 2 million survey responses.

He was able to provide research specific to Tennessee, Williamson County, even down to Franklin. The research showed high stress and depression rates, something which has given local officials pause and reason for concern.

For every Blue Zones Project community, Acker said Healthways conducts a well-being oversample before the project begins to get an accurate snapshot of the baseline state of well-being and conduct oversamples bi-annually afterwards to track changes in well-being over the span of the project. In addition to the Well-Being Index, Healthways also measures a number of other progress and outcome indicators at the organization and community level to track progress over time.

According to Moore, “We’re doing great [in Franklin] compared to the rest of Tennessee but not with the rest of the country.”

People in this county smoke less but drink more, have plenty of healthy food choices and the design of the city with walkways and trails being added is encouraging movement, he said, but added we still have young teenagers smoking, type 2 diabetes is on the rise, opiate use is nearing crisis mode, marijuana use is rising and suicide has risen.

“We can’t treat ourselves out of this, we’ve got to change ourselves out of it,” Moore said.

To read the full story in the Williamson Herald, click here.

To watch the meeting from a Facebook Live recording, click the image below.


Feb. 13 FrankTalks focuses on behavioral health, well-being

To kick-off the 2017 FrankTalks Lecture Series, Franklin Tomorrow’s FrankTalks covered the topic of Creating Community Dialogue. For the February FrankTalks, Franklin Tomorrow will be taking that topic a step further.

Please join us on Monday, the 13th, to hear our speakers lead a “Community Conversation on Caring: Behavioral Health in Williamson County.” Mayor Ken Moore will be joined by Michael Acker, general manager of the BlueZones project for Healthways, and Vona Wilson of the YMCA, to shed light on how behavioral health is impacting our friends, family, neighbors and co-workers.

To RSVP, follow this link.

Everyone will leave with their own copy of “The Blue Zones Solution” by Dan Buettner. This New York Times Best-Selling Author reveals how we can change the way we live, eat, and connect. This FrankTalks is sure to leave you with a balance of self-awareness and awareness of those around you. We hope to see you there!

FrankTalks is held on the second Monday of every month and is presented in partnership with Vanderbilt University’s Office of Community, Neighborhood and Government Relations.

We will have coffee and juice for our social hour from 9:00-9:30 a.m. The program will begin promptly at 9:30 a.m. in the City Hall Training Room.


 

Lipscomb University President Lowry give four tips for “Creating Community Dialogue

Lipscomb University President Randy Lowry was the speaker Jan. 9 at the first Franklin Tomorrow FrankTalks lecture series for 2017, addressing the topic of “Creating Community Dialogue.”

Lipscomb University President Randy Lowry addresses those attending the Jan. 9 Franklin Tomorrow FrankTalks lecture on “Creating Community Dialogue.”

The series is held on the second Monday of the month at various locations across the city. The issue of civil discourse or community dialogue will be a quarterly feature of FrankTalks, which is presented in conjunction with the Vanderbilt University Office of Community, Neighborhood and Government Relations.

“Peace is not the absence of conflict,” Lowry told the group after being introduced by Franklin Mayor Ken Moore. “It is the ability to deal with conflict effectively, efficiently and respectfully.”

For more than 20 years, Lowry has been one of the nation’s leaders in the dispute resolution field and is one of the country’s most sought-after speakers on those subjects. After establishing an innovative program at Willamette University School of Law in Salem, Ore. he founded the Straus Institute for Dispute Resolution at Pepperdine University School of Law. The Straus Institute has been named the No. 1 graduate program of its kind for eight consecutive years, achieving the No. 1 ranking in 11 of the last 16 years by U.S. News & World Report. In 2004, he formalized his longstanding consulting and training practice into the firm now called Strategic Resolutions Group, LLC.

Since joining Lipscomb in September 2005, Lowry has led the Lipscomb community through a period of tremendous growth and connection with the Nashville community, as well as the region.

Lowry pointed out that many don’t realize the diversity in Nashville, with one in eight people in the city having been born in another country.

He gave four steps to creating a community dialogue, including recognizing despite our differences, we are one; coming to grips with diversity and using it as a resource to work together; focus on common interests and “go below the line” of conflict to find out what is driving people; and look for ways to build a relationship not on the conflict, but on something deeper and really seeing the other person.

“A relationship is not going to be built on disagreement. It is going to be built on something else,” Lowry said.

The next FrankTalks lecture will be Monday, Feb. 13, at the training room at Franklin City Hall on the Church Street end of the building. The program will focus on the well-being of our community, both physically and mentally. FrankTalks is free to the public, thanks to the generous support of our partners. It starts at 9 a.m. with a coffee social, followed at 9:30 a.m. by the program, which lasts approximately one hour.

To watch a video of Lowry’s talk, follow this link.

During the event, Franklin Tomorrow Executive Director Mindy Tate shared results of a recent survey of attendees which showed most of those responding thought civility was an issue in their daily lives.


Jan. 9 FrankTalks to focus on ‘Creating Community Dialogue’

Lipscomb University President Randy Lowry to lead discussion
Franklin is a community known for its opportunities. And as we reflect back on 2016, we want to take hold of a new opportunity – an opportunity to engage all of Franklin’s citizens. 
We invite you to join us for our Jan. 9 FrankTalks lecture in a discussion focused on how we interact and engage with each other in our community. The program will be held at the Williamson County Public Library, 1314 Columbia Ave., Franklin, TN, starting with a coffee social at 9 a.m., followed by the program at 9:30 a.m.
Lipscomb University President Randy Lowry will kick off our first FrankTalks of 2017 to cover this ever expanding topic. We hope you’ll join us and bring a friend, as we invite everyone to find a seat at the table.
FrankTalks is held monthly on the second Monday of the month and is presented in partnership with Vanderbilt University’s Office of Community, Neighborhood and Government Relations.

The program is free and open to the public, but we ask you RSVP through this link where you can also complete a survey on community dialogue.

presented by


Dec. 12 FrankTalks lecture focuses on healthy community

The monthly FrankTalks lecture series turned its attention to the health and well-being of our community on Monday, Dec. 12, with Franklin Mayor Ken Moore, Williamson County Health Department Director Cathy Montgomery, and Williamson Medical Center’s Chief Medical Officer, Dr. Starling Evins, presenting to those in attendance at Columbia State Community College.

Moore, who has been a proponent of Franklin Tomorrow’s Get Fit Franklin project, spoke on issues facing our community, including obesity and its impact to create chronic health issues. In 2016, Franklin was named a Healthier Tennessee pilot community by the Governor’s Foundation for a Healthier Tennessee, with Get Fit Franklin as a partner.

Montgomery presented statistics on health rankings and local measurements of teen drug, alcohol, and tobacco use.

Watch the entire program by clicking on this link.


Nov. 14 FrankTalks lecture on ‘Three Things to Know for 2017’ proves popular

Franklin Tomorrow’s monthly lecture series continued Monday, Nov. 14, and proved a popular topic with a panel discussion on “Three Things to Know for 2017” as the topic of the lecture, presented by Vanderbilt University’s Office of Community, Neighborhood and Government Relations, at the Williamson County Public Library.
The panel discussion included Franklin Mayor Ken Moore; Williamson Inc. CEO Matt Largen; Andy Marshall of A. Marshall Foods; and David Logan, president of the Williamson County Association of Realtors.

panelists-panel
FrankTalks is a monthly lecture series presented for the Franklin community by Vanderbilt University’s Office of Community, Neighborhood and Government Relations. The event is free and is held monthly at locations across the county.
The next FrankTalks lecture will be Monday, Dec. 12, and will focus on how to have a healthy and happy 2017.
A video of the Nov. 14 event can be viewed by clicking the link below. Thanks to the City of Franklin Communications Department for recording the video using Facebook Live.


Nov. 14 FrankTalks lecture to feature panel on ‘Three Things to Know for 2017’

What are the three things you need to know for 2017 from the areas of entertainment & tourism, real estate, local government, and business? Join Franklin Tomorrow on Monday, Nov. 14, for our monthly FrankTalks and you can find out from our panel of local experts.

FrankTalks is a monthly lecture series presented for the Franklin community by Vanderbilt University’s Office of Community, Neighborhood and Government Relations. The event is free and will begin at 9 a.m. with a coffee social, followed at 9:30 a.m. by the program with our panelists.

Joining us on Nov. 14 will be Franklin Mayor Ken Moore, David Logan of the Williamson County Association of Realtors, Matt Largen of Williamson Inc., and Andy Marshall of Puckett’s Gro. & Restaurant.

panelists-panel

We expect a little humor from this panel, but also some great insight into 2017, so you won’t want to miss.

Eventbrite - FrankTalks: Three Things to Know for 2017

FrankTalks is a monthly series, presented by Vanderbilt University’s Office of Community, Neighborhood and Government Relations.

FrankTalks will begin at 9 a.m. on Monday, Nov. 14, at the Williamson County Public Library with a coffee social, followed by the program at 9:30 a.m. The library is located at 1314 Columbia Ave. It does not open until 9 a.m., but you will be admitted after check-in for those with tickets first to ensure we have enough seating. The program should end no later than 10:45 a.m.

FrankTalks is a program of Franklin Tomorrow and presented by Vanderbilt University’s Office of Community, Neighborhood & Government Relations. It is free.

Guests who have RSVP’ed will be admitted first and others as seating allows. There is no need to print your ticket as your name will be on the RSVP list at check-in.

Vanderbilt logo

Frank Talks


FrankTalks draws crowd to hear Robert Hicks
speak on latest book, ‘The Orphan Mother’

New York Times-bestselling author Robert Hicks was the featured speaker on Monday, Oct. 10, at Franklin Tomorrow’s monthly FrankTalks lecture to discuss his latest book, “The Orphan Mother.” Hicks told stories about the book’s origins to those attending the event, presented by Vanderbilt University’s Office of Community, Neighborhood, and Government Relations in partnership with the Williamson County Public Library and Ingram Content Group.

Mindy Tate of Franklin Tomorrow, author Robert Hicks, Dolores Greenwald, Joel Tomlin, and Lynn Maddox at FrankTalks Oct. 10 at the Williamson County Public Library.

Mindy Tate of Franklin Tomorrow, author Robert Hicks, Dolores Greenwald, Joel Tomlin, and Lynn Maddox at FrankTalks Oct. 10 at the Williamson County Public Library.

His third historical novel, Hicks said he did not set out to write a trilogy of books about Franklin during and following the Civil War and the pivotal Battle of Franklin, but since writing his New York Times bestseller, “Widow of the South,” he had always been drawn to the story of Mariah Reddick, who is the central character in “The Orphan Mother.”

Copies of the book are available through the Williamson County Public Library and programs are being organized for book clubs, church groups, and others to read the book as part of  a “community read” program to allow for discussion of the book’s themes of racial equality and justice.

 

 


Oct. 10 FrankTalks lecture to feature
Robert Hicks on new book, ‘The Orphan Mother’

Seating limited, so make reservation early

New York Times-bestselling author Robert Hicks will discuss his latest book, “The Orphan Mother,” and its themes of racial equality, education, family issues and civil discourse at Franklin Tomorrow’s FrankTalks lecture, set for Monday, Oct. 10, at the Williamson County Public Library, 1314 Columbia Ave.

theorphanmother-hcfinal“The Orphan Mother” was released Sept. 13 and Franklin Tomorrow is featuring it as a “community read,” with copies available at the Williamson County Public Library, as well as at Landmark Booksellers and online retailers.

The Oct. 10 program will begin at 9 a.m. with a coffee social, followed at 9:30 a.m. by a talk by Hicks. To RSVP, follow this link. Seating at the library will be limited to 100 people and those with RSVPs will be admitted first.

“As many reviewers have noted, the themes in the book of justice and racial equality are still relevant today,” said Mindy Tate, Franklin Tomorrow executive director. “As a community visioning organization, it is our hope, through this book and future sessions of FrankTalks, to ensure that a dialogue of civil discourse is fed in our community.”

Described as “epic tale of one remarkable woman’s quest for justice,” the book is set in the years following the Civil War and tells the story of Mariah Reddick, former slave to Carrie McGavock – the “Widow of the South,” the subject of Hicks’ first historical novel. His second novel, “A Separate Country,” was set in New Orleans and was based on the true love story of Confederate Gen. John Bell Hood and his wife, Anna Marie.

Watch Hicks discuss “The Orphan Mother” on this video.

 

He is founding chairman emeritus of Franklin’s Charge: A Vision and Campaign for the Preservation of Historic Open Space, in the fight to secure and preserve the historic battlefield in Williamson County.

In December 2005, the Nashville Tennessean named him ‘Tennessean of the Year’ for the impact “The Widow of the South,” has had on Tennessee, heritage tourism and preservation.

In the October 2014, Robert introduced his Battlefield Bourbon, a very small batch, Tennessee-made, aged and hand-bottled Tennessee bourbon whiskey. With this The Nashville Tennessean gave Hicks his other favorite title: “Whiskey Preservationist”.

FrankTalks is a monthly series, presented by Vanderbilt University’s Office of Community, Neighborhood and Government Relations. Seating at the library is limited to 100 people, and although the event is free, individuals are asked to RSVP for the event.

Eventbrite - FrankTalks: A Conversation with Robert Hicks about ''The Orphan Mother''

Vanderbilt logo


Sept. 12 FrankTalks lecture to kick off Mobility Week
with focus on importance of school bus ridership

Franklin Tomorrow’s monthly FrankTalks lecture on Monday, Sept. 12, will focus on the importance of school bus ridership and trends in student transportation as the kickoff event of Williamson Inc.’s Williamson County Mobility Week.

FrankTalks is presented by Vanderbilt University's Office of Community, Neighborhood & Governement Relations

FrankTalks is presented by Vanderbilt University’s Office of Community, Neighborhood & Governement Relations

FrankTalks is a monthly series, presented by Vanderbilt University’s Office of Community, Neighborhood and Government Relations. Nissan is the presenting sponsor of Mobility Week, which will continued Sept 12-16 with a different focus daily on practical ways that the community can work collaboratively as a community to reduce traffic congestion on our roadways.

To RSVP for Sept. 12, please follow this link.

On Sept. 12, FrankTalks will feature a panel on school bus transportation, as well as innovations in school bus safety, technology tools for parents to better track their child, as well as ways to improve walkability around area schools and in neighborhoods as children walk to their bus stops.

Franklin Tomorrow will provide training and encourage those present to conduct walkability audits of their neighborhoods and provide that information to Franklin Tomorrow for collection in a report to the City of Franklin.

FrankTalks will be held at Freedom Middle School, 750 New Highway 96 West, in Franklin, with a ribbon cutting and coffee social starting at 9 a.m. Directional signs will point to parking at the adjacent Poplar Grove School and how to enter the building for the meeting.

The program will start at 9:30 a.m. and is free to the public thanks to the generous partnerships supporting the series.

Mobility Week - Williamson, Inc


‘City Hall on Wheels’ returns Aug. 8 as part of FrankTalks

Franklin Tomorrow’s 2016 FrankTalks lecture series will continue Monday, Aug. 8, in the Community Room in the Administration building of the new Columbia State Community College campus at 1128 Liberty Pike in Franklin.

Stuckey

Stuckey

Franklin City Administrator Eric Stuckey will bring the “City Hall on Wheels” to east Franklin for the monthly event, which will begin at 9 a.m. with a coffee social, followed at 9:30 a.m. by Stuckey’s presentation. He will explain what’s on the horizon in the city in terms of projects, but also will use the time to hear from residents on potential projects and issues across the city.

Franklin Tomorrow is partnering with Vanderbilt University’s Office of Neighborhood, Government and Community Relations to expand the frequency of FrankTalks in 2016 to a monthly program, starting with this event.

The new campus of Columbia State Community College is located at 1228 Liberty Pike, east of Carothers Parkway. The event will be held in the Community Room, located in Room 221 of Building A on the campus.

“FrankTalks will explore issues and topics of concern in our community in a smaller, more accessible venue than our highly popular Breakfast With the Mayors’ series,” said Tim Murphy, Franklin Tomorrow’s 2016 Board president. “It is our hope to schedule these at different times throughout the day on the second Monday of each month to engage those unable to attend other events due to childcare or other time constraints.”

Stuckey has been city administrator since 2009 and as the city’s top administrative official, he oversees day-to-day operations and works with the Board of Mayor and Aldermen (BOMA) to chart the strategic direction of the City.

The public is invited to FrankTalks, which is free and open to the public. To register for the Aug. 8 event, please follow this link.

WC Map with Address & Phone Number

Franklin Police Chief promises ‘frank talk’ June 13

City of Franklin Police Chief Deb Faulkner will be the speaker for Franklin Tomorrow’s Monday, June 13, FrankTalks lecture, presented by Vanderbilt University’s Office of Community, Neighborhood and Government Relations.

Franklin Police Chief Deb Faulkner

Franklin Police Chief Deb Faulkner

Chief Faulkner leads the 160 men and women who make up the Franklin Police Department. These dedicated officers and civilian staff serve our customers with a professional, progressive, and responsive approach to modern-day policing.

Her topic June 13 will be,  “Frank Talk From the Police Chief: 21st Century Policing in Historic Franklin.”

The event will begin at 9 a.m. in Townsend Hall at the Westhaven Residents’ Club, 401 Cheltenham Ave. with a 30-minute coffee social and then the program at 9:30 a.m. Her topic will be “Frank Talk From the Police Chief: 21st Century Policing in Historic Franklin.”

RSVP by following this link.

FrankTalks is presented by Vanderbilt University's Office of Community, Neighborhood & Governement Relations

FrankTalks is presented by Vanderbilt University’s Office of Community, Neighborhood & Government Relations

FrankTalks is a monthly community conversation series that provides an opportunity for Franklin residents to learn, engage, and discuss topics that help shape our community. The series fits with the Franklin Tomorrow’s goal to engage the community on important topics in our community and inspire discussion which foster collaboration.

Prior to joining the Franklin Police Department in 2014, Chief Faulkner was Tennessee’s first Inspector General. A retired Metropolitan Nashville Police Officer, Faulkner came up through the ranks, serving in Metro’s Patrol Division and various other assignments before retiring from the Nashville Police Department at the rank of Deputy Chief. She has her bachelor’s degree in Journalism from the University of Memphis; her master’s in Criminal Justice from Middle Tennessee State University; and, her doctorate in Human Development Counseling from Vanderbilt University.

Chief Faulkner is the past President for the Fifty Forward Board, YWCA, and the Susan G. Komen Nashville Affiliate. She has also served on the boards of the Girl Scouts, Goodwill, Catholic Charities, CABLE, and Building Lives of Vets.  Chief Faulkner is a recipient of the Athena Award, and was also inducted into the Academy for Women of Achievement.  She received the Girl Scout’s Volunteer Award, CABLE’s Spirit of Leadership Award,the Molly Todd Cup, and the Fifty Forward Harriet Foley Leadership Award.

The Franklin Police Department is Internationally accredited by the Commission on Accreditation for Law Enforcement Agencies.

For questions, please call (615) 794-0998.

FrankTalks continues May 9 with “I Can’t Talk, I’m Driving” at Main Library

Does distracted driving impact traffic congestion?
The people have spoken. Traffic congestion continually ranks high in Williamson County road woes.
Everyone is multi-tasking as they drive down the road. Have you missed a green light because the person in front of you had their head down in their apps?  Or missed a meeting due to a crash on the interstate?  Many traffic snags are caused by distracted drivers. But more importantly, our safety is also compromised. Imagine the day your 16-year-old has license in hand. Now picture his first solo drive with one hand on the wheel and the other on his cellphone. A quick text or SnapChat to a friend to celebrate the occasion.

If your children are young, this day will be here before you know it.  How we model good behavior behind the wheel now will shape the driver they eventually become.  If they see you talking on your phone every day or checking and answering email at stoplights, that wi

FrankTalks is presented by Vanderbilt University's Office of Community, Neighborhood & Governement Relations

FrankTalks is presented by Vanderbilt University’s Office of Community, Neighborhood & Governement Relations

ll become a part of the normal driving experience to them.

Join RightLane for a humorous, engaging FrankTalk on Distracted Driving with an emphasis on hands-on activities and popular culture. Leave with information on the myths of multitasking, why cellphones and cars don’t mix, and how to be an advocate for your family and community.
The event will begin at 9 a.m. with coffee, followed by the program at 9:30 a.m. FrankTalks is presented by Vanderbilt University’s Office of Community, Neighborhood and Government Relations.

Eventbrite - FrankTalks: "I Can't Talk Now, I'm Driving: A Surprising Culprit in Traffic Congestion."

Take our poll on driving habits by the image below.
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Take our poll on distracted driving habits!

April 11 FrankTalks features Regional Transportation plan results

Franklin Tomorrow is partnering with Vanderbilt University’s Office of Community, Neighborhood and Government Relations to present the monthly FrankTalks series with the next event set for April 11.

FrankTalks is presented by Vanderbilt University's Office of Community, Neighborhood & Governement Relations

FrankTalks is presented by Vanderbilt University’s Office of Community, Neighborhood & Governement Relations

On April 11, FrankTalks will feature Regional Transportation Authority Chief Steve Bland reporting on the outcomes of the nMotion plan during a lunch session at the Williamson County Association of REALTORS®, 1646 Westgate Circle off Moores Lane in Brentwood.
Seating is limited for this event, which will include lunch provided by Jim N’Nick’s BBQ, as well as our partners at The TMA Group, Franklin Tomorrow, and Williamson County Association of REALTORS®.

To register, follow this link.

The Middle Tennessee region is one of the fastest-growing areas in Tennessee and in the country. The entire 10-county region is projected to grow by 80%, with 3.1 million residents calling Middle Tennessee home by 2040. Most of this growth will occur in the nine counties surrounding Nashville/Davidson County, and the total population of those counties is projected to grow by 111% from approximately 1 million residents to 2.3 million. The continued health and prosperity of the Middle Tennessee region is dependent on the development of a robust and efficient regional transportation system.
The Regional Transportation Authority (RTA) is hard at work to provide new and better transit options that ensure everyone can get where they need to in a cost-effective and timely manner. To determine how best to expand regional transit service, the RTA has spent the last year updating their Strategic Transit Plan, known as nMotion 2015. A series of meetings were held across the region last fall to discuss the specific transit and transportation needs of each county, including Williamson County. The first wave of public engagement for the nMotion Strategic Plan Service was bi-directional, with thousands of Middle Tennesseans commenting on their values, concerns, and desires for the future of regional mobility.

2016 WC Trends Report 15

WCAR Logo TMA-logo-MASTER-JPEG(1)JNN-COM-LOGOCumberland Region Tomorrow

Transit Alliance

 

 

Franklin Tomorrow kicks off 2016 FrankTalks series March 14

City Administrator Stuckey to deliver ‘City Hall on Wheels’

Franklin City Administrator Eric Stuckey will kick off Franklin Tomorrow’s 2016 FrankTalks lecture series on Monday, March 14, in Townsend Hall at the Westhaven Residents Center.

Office of Community, Neighborhood, and Government Relations

Office of Community, Neighborhood, and Government Relations

Franklin Tomorrow is partnering with Vanderbilt University’s Office of Neighborhood, Government and Community Relations to expand the frequency of FrankTalks in 2016 to a monthly program, starting with this event.

“FrankTalks will explore issues and topics of concern in our community in a smaller, more accessible venue than our highly popular Breakfast With the Mayors’ series,” said Tim Murphy, Franklin Tomorrow’s 2016 Board president. “It is our hope to schedule these at different times throughout the day on the second Monday of each month to engage those unable to attend other events due to childcare or other time constraints.”

This first event with Stuckey is almost a “‘City Hall on Wheels,” giving residents a chance to meet Stuckey, who will explain what’s on the horizon in the city in terms of projects, but also will use the time to hear from residents on potential projects and issues across the city.

Stuckey has been city administrator since 2009 and as the city’s top administrative official,

Stuckey

Stuckey

he oversees day-to-day operations and works with the Board of Mayor and Aldermen (BOMA) to chart the strategic direction of the City.

The public is invited to FrankTalks, which is free and open to the public. To register for the March 14 event, please follow this link or fill out the form at the bottom of this page.

The Westhaven Residents Center is located at 401 Cheltenham Ave. in Westhaven, which is located off Highway 96 West, three miles west of Franklin. The event will begin at 9 a.m. with coffee and a chance for participants to meet each other and Stuckey, whose program will begin at 9:30 a.m. and last approximately one hour.

On April 11, FrankTalks will feature Regional Transportation Authority Chief Steve Bland reporting on the outcomes of the nMotion plan during a lunch session at the Williamson County Association of REALTORS® on Westgate Circle in Brentwood.

 

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